Passabe (2006) and Aki Ra’s Boys (2007) @ Sinema Old School

Passabe (2006)
Directors: James Leong, Lynn Lee

Screening times at Sinema Old School:
27 & 29 Nov 2008: 8:00; 30 Nov 2008: 2:30 pm

“They came from Passabe. They came from Imbate. They came from Oesilo. They came from Oecussi.
They came firing their guns. How could we fight them? With stones?”

“The Remote Village of Passabe lies on the precarious border between East and West Timor. It is a battle-scarred community with a horrific past. In the run up to the vote for independence in 1999, Passabe was a base for hundreds of pro-Indonesian militiamen who participated in a rampage of violence that climaxed in a bloody massacre.

Five years on, one man publicly owns up to his role in the massacre, an explosive move that exposes him to persecution on both sides. Shot over a year, this film documents a quest for forgiveness and redemption, and hopefully, reconciliation.”

Aki Ra’s Boys (2007)
Directors: James Leong, Lynn Lee

Screening times at Sinema Old School: 23 Nov 2008: 10:15 pm

“Boreak was six when he lost his right arm in a landmine accident. Family members rushed the young Cambodian to a nearby hospital where so-called “doctors” performed a crude amputation. Burdened with eight other children to feed and unable to cope with the stress of handling a crippled son, Boreak’s parents decided to send him to a home in Siem Reap for young landmine victims.

Aki Ra’s Boys offers a unique insight into the effect that a devastating weapon – the land mine – has on its victims and survivors, both during battle and in the long years that follow.”

Singapore Postal Codes on Google Maps

SinGeo alerted us that Singapore postal codes are now supported on Google Maps.

I tried “singapore 119077” – NUS’ address since its right next to my department and here is what I got:

Some other addresses were slightly off. Try it out yourself and report your results to SinGeo.

This use of postal codes is a great new shortcut—I can myself requesting friends to include postal codes in addresses they send me; previously it was moot. Now in NUS, the mail does not come to our doorstep nut is processed centrally so I think our department’s postal code is not listed in the Singapore Post directory – 117543 but that draws a blank.

Luckily we’re just next door to University Hall which 119077 zeroes in to, and its where we direct many visitors to as the location of the most important thing (Spinelli’s). You will also see my user-generated map listed in the sidebar. So 19077 is a number I am going to remember from now on.

Of course the big problem we have to sort out with Google is that Science Drives 3 and 4 are incorrectly labelled!

p.s. Gothere trumps Google Maps – e.g. see http://gothere.sg/directions#119077: – all you have to do is add your postal code at the end.

Bean – a free rich text editor for the Mac

I love text editors for their simplicity compared to word processors. Often I simply need to get that text down without the fuss and bother of something complex like Pages or Word. Text Editors are itsy-bitsy apps that fire up really quickly and almost never crash. So they are efficient, and still work well on really old or aging macs like my 12.1″ iBook from 2002.

My current text editor of choice is TextWrangler, a great free plain text editor from Bare Bones Software that coders use due to several features like syntax highlighting and writing to server files directly. It’s great for me to maintain Habitatnews and the many other webpages I manage. And without using webpage generating software. So I am quick in and out. If I need to tidy up, its a quick cut and paste into Pages or Word for formatting.

There have been times when I have wished for the bare bones Text Wrangler to have a little bit of functionality for my writing. Then I read about Bean (bean-osx.com ) in the recent edition of MacWorld.

Bean calls itself a rich text editor and is open source and free of charge as well. I’ll be taking Bean for a spin. It can export to html, pdf and doc formats, albeit with some limitations.

Bean may prove to be a boon for my writing needs. And I just love that coffee cup icon!