From Singapore with Love: Wildlife protection and an alternative to the desperate poisoning of dogs in the Himalaya

Poisoning dogs with rat poison and drowning puppies? The desperate action by Himalayan communities to protect their livestock from dog attacks speaks of another tragedy – attacks on wildlife by dogs and secondary poisoning of wildlife from poisoned dog carcasses.

Sterilisation is a sustainable, and ecologically-sensitive plan of action

So we’re sending some love from Singapore once again via the Himalayan Mutt Project to offer a kinder and and more effective alternative – sterilisation. Chip in to help Debby with her fund-raising efforts at Pozible.

Debby Ng has a been a passionate environmentalist all her life and even as a young teen, took action by writing to the forum page of the Straits Times. After her first dive at Pulau Hantu in 2003, she determinedly chipped away at a keyboard to start blogging, and today The Hantu Blog has matured into a community which has contributed significantly to awareness about marine life in our shores.

So it is not a case of half measures with this lady. Learning about the miserable situation for wildlife, dogs and the community in Nepal’s Himalaya during a visit in 2013, and with local partnership, they initiated a humane, ecologically-positive partnership with existing animal welfare organisations in Nepal. Funding from Singapore and elsewhere and dedicated work by a committed group brought sterilisation to an uncontrolled situation.

Find out more at the Himalayan Mutt Project’s Pozible site where Debby has provided a comprehensive explanation about the project, its sustainable methods and the success of last year’s exercise.

It IS enticing – just S$10 provides bright red little collars for small, sterilised dogs preventing accidental culling of neutered dogs (in combination with with marked ears) – and provides for five rabies vaccinations.

CNVR camp in Ilam East Nepal hill region tea growing district
CNVR (Catch-Neuter-Vaccinate-Release ) camp in Ilam East Nepal hill region, tea growing district; photo from the Himalayan Mutt Project
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